Saturday, October 29, 2011

Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland



Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland
2012 New Member Brochure


Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland
Table of Contents

Welcome Introduction: 1
Your Mentor: 1
History of Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland: 1
CTCC Officers: 2
Classic Thunderbird Club International: 2
Communication: 3
Activities: 3
Etiquette: 4
Library: 4
Buying a Classic Thunderbird: 5
Classic Thunderbird Data Plate: (see separate article on web site) 5
Items to carry in your Classic Thunderbird: 6
Vendors of Classic Thunderbird Parts and Accessories: 7
Insurance for your Classic Thunderbird: 8
Care and Storage of your Classic Thunderbird: 8
Closing Message: 9
Attachments:
· History of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbird: 10
· Data Plate Decoder: 13
· The Thunderbird in Native American Culture : 18
· The Thunderbird and Entertainment: 21
– Books, Memorabilia, Song, Movies & Wine
Enclosures:
· Recent issue of the CTCC “Bird News”
· CTCC Membership Roster

Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland
Welcome Introduction:
On behalf of the members of the Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland, we welcome you as a new member.
Your Mentor:
You have been assigned a mentor to assist you in taking full advantage of the numerous enjoyable opportunities of becoming a member. If not already, the mentor will be in contact with you soon.
History of CTCC:
The Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland (CTCC) held its first meeting on August 28, 1961.[1] The club was originally chartered as the Thunderbird Sports of Chicagoland. In 1964, the club’s name was revised to the Classic Thunderbird Club, thus eliminating the “sports car” designation and placing emphasis on the “Classic” features inherent in the 1955, 1956 and 1957 Thunderbird.
In 1963, the Chicagoland members traveled to Dearborn, Michigan, where the Ford Motor Company hosted a truly magnificent Thunderbird convention. This event set the stage for the first Classic Thunderbird Club International (CTCI) convention, which was also held in Dearborn in 1964.The purpose of CTCI is to bring together owners of this unique automobile and to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas, technical information, social activity and fellowship. Whether your Classic Thunderbird is a driver or show car, members have found CTCC an invaluable support group of spirited enthusiasts. In recent years CTCC has maintained over 100 members. CTCC is one of more than
115 chapters of the Classic Thunderbird Club International and located in Region 2 (North Central) and designated Chapter “9.”

[1] Summarized from Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland membership form, 2003.

CTCC Officers:
President: Pete Kramer
Vice President: Tom Bruin
Secretary: Liz Werth
Treasurer: Doug Rogers
Directors: Ken Smizinski
Pete Ekstrom
Len Vinyard
“Bird News” Editor: Bert Eisenhour
Membership Chairperson: Madeline Zambon
Publicity: Liz Werth
Librarian: Bob Wenderski
Technical: Ken Smizinski
Website Administration: Joel Greenberg
Classic Thunderbird Club International:
CTCC members are strongly encouraged to join Classic Thunderbird Club International (CTCI) that has approximately 6,000 members and over 115 chartered chapters in 23 countries. The bi-monthly magazine “Early Bird” keeps members informed on an array of events and upcoming activities. Attending regional and national CTCI events is a great way to meet and enjoy the company of other Classic Thunderbird enthusiasts throughout the country. Information about CTCI can be found at http://www.ctci.org/.


Communication:
CTCC members historically have communicated and kept informed through the monthly “Bird News” publication. With the advent of the internet CTCC now augments the “Bird News” with our website that can be reached at http://www.ctcc9.org/. CTCC members can elect to receive the “Bird News” in hard copy by regular mail or by email in an electronic file format. In the “Bird News” and on the website you will find a discussion and photos of recent activities, the treasurer’s report, valuable tips, advertisements, notes about the past, and, most important, detailed information about upcoming activities.
Activities:
CTCC attempts to reach out to all members with a variety of enjoyable activities throughout the year. The list of activities may include, but is certainly not limited to:
· Formal meetings for election of officers & directors and to provide an annual budget proposal
· 3 to 4-day Spring and Fall Tours visiting museums, private collections and even shopping
· Day trips to visit gardens and to enjoy the fall colors
· Fun social meetings - brunches, dinners, festivals, carnivals, plays, shows, dances, fairs, wine tastings, etc.
· Annual CTCC picnic
· Judged shows and meets
· Regional and national events
· Cruise nights
· Participation in holiday parades
· Tech sessions
· Holiday celebration

While we take our Classic Thunderbirds seriously, the bottom line is we attempt to make the most out of enjoying the camaraderie of fellow enthusiasts. Moreover, if you have a thought for a future event, please inform the officers of the Club, as new activities provide exciting opportunities!
Etiquette:
For those individuals new to antique automobile collecting and motoring, it is quite helpful to be aware of expected behavior. Not only will you interact with CTCC members, but every so often we have the opportunity to visit exquisite collections receiving a personal tour by the owner, family and or friends. Some specific etiquette suggestions are:
· Do not touch an antique automobile without the owner’s permission.
· Don't make loud, insulting remarks about others' cars. They may own a “driver” that means more to them than even a “show” car does to you.
· Park wisely and respect the space requirements of other participants.
· Take care that all-weather covers and tenting used doesn't impede others or scratch neighboring vehicles.
· Dress appropriately for a public event; anything too skimpy or revealing will not be suitable in a family friendly environment.
· Take care with food and beverages, spillages can easily damage paint and leather-work.
If you are unsure about a certain situation, ask an experienced CTCC member for advice and don’t be bashful – we have all had the same question before!
Library:
CTCC is fortunate to have a comprehensive library that offers magazines, brochures, maintenance manuals, etc. It includes a complete collection of “Early Bird” and “Bird News” periodicals. CTCC members are allowed to “check out” holdings of the library for personal use by contacting the Club Librarian. We ask that you treat these items with special care so that can they continue to be enjoyed by current and future CTCC members. A listing of CTCC Library holdings can be found on the Club’s website: http://www.ctcc9.org/. Additionally, the website includes an archive of numerous articles on technical “tech” tips that provide invaluable information and insight.
Buying a Classic Thunderbird:
For those wishing to become Classic Thunderbird owners the best advice you can receive is to join a Classic Thunderbird club and learn as much as possible before you make your first purchase. A Classic Thunderbird may be worth as little as $3,000 or beyond $200,000 for the most rare, pristine examples. In purchasing an antique automobile there are no guarantees – BUYER BEWARE! Even experienced CTCC members will say, “When purchasing a Classic Thunderbird, expect to pay another 30% to get the car in the condition that you thought you were purchasing.” That doesn’t mean show quality condition – just what you thought you were getting at the time of purchase. This statement highlights just how challenging it is to discover all the items that will soon require your attention. However, there are some things you can do to make a more informed purchase. First, never ever purchase an antique automobile sight unseen. Second, if you do not have extensive experience and knowledge of Classic Thunderbirds, hire someone that does to inspect the automobile for you – even if it is at an auction. By doing so you might recoup upwards of ten times what it will cost you for the inspection. Be sure to do a thorough check on the individual’s qualifications and ask for and speak with references. Fortunately, within CTCC we have members with extensive buying experience who can be of valuable assistance.
Classic Thunderbird Data Plate:
The best way to understand the unique characteristics of a Classic Thunderbird is to decode the information from the data plate located on the firewall of the engine compartment near the heater duct. A data plate decoder can be found in the Appendices section of this Brochure or at the CTCI web site: www.ctci.org/decoder.php. By conducting this investigative exercise, you will be able to obtain information about the original:
· Engine code
· Exterior paint color
· Interior trim color
· Date of manufacture (Birthday!)
· Where the automobile was first sold
You may discover that the original color has been changed or the engine replaced with a version different from the original. Make sure you check that the VIN number on the data plate matches the stamped number on the frame rail located on the passenger’s side of the engine. In some instances, a new data plate can be made to more accurately reflect these changes without detracting from the value of your Classic Thunderbird. It is always recommended to check with a Club member, especially our officer “Technical Expert,” who has extensive knowledge of judging before making any modification.
Items to carry in your Classic Thunderbird:
In addition to essential registration and insurance information:
· Fire Extinguisher – not only is a fire extinguisher an essential safety item, but it is also a mandatory item at sanctioned events where your Classic Thunderbird will be judged. Be sure to keep the fire extinguisher in the passenger area, where it is easily accessible, versus the trunk. A general purpose fire extinguisher can be obtained at nominal cost. However, some recommend spending a bit more for a halon fire extinguisher. They are the extinguisher of choice for electrical equipment and aircraft, because the chemical agent halon is electrically non-conducting and when the extinguisher is used it leaves little residue. Since antique automobiles can catch fire from old and faulty wiring, paying a bit extra for a halon fire extinguisher may prove to be a wise investment. Some halon fire extinguishers are so small they can fit comfortably into your Classic Thunderbird’s glove compartment. Be sure to read the instructions for the fire extinguisher prior to use. Not handling the fire extinguisher properly could cause personal injury.
· Repair tools & other items: You may choose to carry a few tools or a repair tool kit. The repair tools you decide to carry may take into account the length of your trip, your ability to use the tools, and available space. When a spare tire is added in the trunk of a 1955 or 1956 Classic Thunderbird the available space is limited, so choose carefully. The following list is simply to serve as a guide for those new to owning a Classic Thunderbird:
o Adjustable wrench
o Cleaning items
o Duct tape
o Jumper cables
o Quart of engine oil
o Regular and cross tip screwdrivers
o Safety kit
o Small floor jack and wrench (try not to use the original jack that came with the Classic Thunderbird, as they can be extremely unstable and dangerous)
o Transmission fluid
o Vise grips
An emergency kit of essential items travels with the caravan of Member’s Classic Thunderbirds during the CTTC Spring and Fall Tours.
· Accessory items: Classic Thunderbirds were built long before comfort items like cup holders became common, standard accessories. Having a center console that offers some of the special comforts common in modern automobiles will make the driving experience even more enjoyable.

Vendors of Classic Thunderbird Parts and Accessories:
· CASCO – http://www.classictbird.com/ · Prestige Thunderbird, Inc. – www.prestigethunderbird.com
· The Classic Car-Nection – www.car-nection.com
· Thunderbird Headquarters – http://www.tbirdhq.com/
· T-Bird Sanctuary – http://www.tbirdsanctuary.com/
Parts can also be bought and sold on eBay – http://www.ebay.com/. When looking for a costly item, it is recommended to check first with CTCC members as they may be aware of where the best quality and price can be found or even better if a member is considering selling an extra part.
When conducting tours, drivers of Classic Thunderbirds of CTCC communicate by Motorola Spirit MU21CV, 464.500 MHz, two-way radios. While these radios are no longer manufactured, they can be found along with the charging device on eBay. You may wish to pay more for the Motorola RDU202, replacement radio. Before making a purchase it is best to check with an experienced Club member to ensure you have the proper model and frequency. You may even discover there is an extra radio for sale at a very reasonable price within CTCC.
Insurance for your Classic Thunderbird:
Companies that specialize in antique automobile insurance include, but are not limited to, the following:
· American Collectors
· Classic Collectors
· Grundy
· Hagerty
· J.C. Taylor
Care and storage of your Classic Thunderbird:
It is good practice to change your engine oil annually even if you put very few miles on your Classic Thunderbird. When doing so, look for oil that includes additives for antique automobiles and also change the oil filter. It is recommended to add a quick disconnect to the battery. It should be used when the vehicle is not in use. When you are not driving your Classic Thunderbird during cold weather months it is important that you start your Thunderbird at least once a month for twenty or more minutes. It is wise to disconnect the battery from the automobile’s electrical system and connect it to a “drip” or “trickle” charger to help ensure there is a sufficient charge the next time you start your Classic Thunderbird. A fuel additive, such as super concentrated PRI-G Complete Gasoline Treatment that can be purchased on eBay, is essential to keep your gasoline fresh. Other fuel additives, such as Sea Foam Motor Treatment for gas and diesel engines, will help performance and lessen normal wear and tear. They can be found in the automotive section of most discount or auto supply stores. It is also recommended to maintain your Classic Thunderbird’s tire pressure at 35 psi.
Closing Message:
The future of the Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland is only as promising as the potential contribution of our newest member(s). Thus, we welcome you with open arms and will make every attempt to make you feel comfortable. We trust you will actively participate in as many activities as possible so you can make your membership experience truly enjoyable and memorable.
Welcome to the Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland and happy motoring,
Len Keil
President
PS: Be sure to let us know how we can best serve you!
Appendices:
· History of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbird
· Classic Thunderbird Data Plate Decoder· Prestige Thunderbird, Inc. – www.prestigethunderbird.com
· The Classic Car-Nection – www.car-nection.com
· Thunderbird Headquarters – http://www.tbirdhq.com/
· T-Bird Sanctuary – http://www.tbirdsanctuary.com/
Parts can also be bought and sold on eBay – http://www.ebay.com/. When looking for a costly item, it is recommended to check first with CTCC members as they may be aware of where the best quality and price can be found or even better if a member is considering selling an extra part.
When conducting tours, drivers of Classic Thunderbirds of CTCC communicate by Motorola Spirit MU21CV, 464.500 MHz, two-way radios. While these radios are no longer manufactured, they can be found along with the charging device on eBay. You may wish to pay more for the Motorola RDU202, replacement radio. Before making a purchase it is best to check with an experienced Club member to ensure you have the proper model and frequency. You may even discover there is an extra radio for sale at a very reasonable price within CTCC.
Insurance for your Classic Thunderbird:
Companies that specialize in antique automobile insurance include, but are not limited to, the following:
· American Collectors
· Classic Collectors
· Grundy
· Hagerty
· J.C. Taylor
Care and storage of your Classic Thunderbird:
It is good practice to change your engine oil annually even if you put very few miles on your Classic Thunderbird. When doing so, look for oil that includes additives for antique automobiles and also change the oil filter. It is recommended to add a quick disconnect to the battery. It should be used when the vehicle is not in use. When you are not driving your Classic Thunderbird during cold weather months it is important that you start your Thunderbird at least once a month for twenty or more minutes. It is wise to disconnect the battery from the automobile’s electrical system and connect it to a “drip” or “trickle” charger to help ensure there is a sufficient charge the next time you start your Classic Thunderbird. A fuel additive, such as super concentrated PRI-G Complete Gasoline Treatment that can be purchased on eBay, is essential to keep your gasoline fresh. Other fuel additives, such as Sea Foam Motor Treatment for gas and diesel engines, will help performance and lessen normal wear and tear. They can be found in the automotive section of most discount or auto supply stores. It is also recommended to maintain your Classic Thunderbird’s tire pressure at 35 psi.
Closing Message:
The future of the Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland is only as promising as the potential contribution of our newest member(s). Thus, we welcome you with open arms and will make every attempt to make you feel comfortable. We trust you will actively participate in as many activities as possible so you can make your membership experience truly enjoyable and memorable.
Welcome to the Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland and happy motoring,
Len Keil
President
PS: Be sure to let us know how we can best serve you!
Appendices:
· History of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbird
· Classic Thunderbird Data Plate Decoder
· The Thunderbird in Native American Culture
· The Thunderbird and Entertainment – Song, Movies & Wine
Enclosures: (Mail or email attachment)Recent issue of the
· The Thunderbird in Native American Culture
· The Thunderbird and Entertainment – Song, Movies & Wine
Enclosures: (Mail or email attachment)Recent issue of the
· Concours Parts – http://www.concours.com/
· Hill’s Automotive –www.hillsresto.com
· Ken’s Classics – 847-397-3747 (Owned and operated by CTCC Officer Ken Smizinski)
· Larry’s Thunderbird & Mustang Parts, Inc. - http://www.larrystbird.com/
· Mac’s Antique Auto Parts – http://www.macsantigueautoparts.com/
· Prestige Thunderbird, Inc. – www.prestigethunderbird.com
· The Classic Car-Nection – www.car-nection.com
· Thunderbird Headquarters – http://www.tbirdhq.com/
· T-Bird Sanctuary – http://www.tbirdsanctuary.com/
Parts can also be bought and sold on eBay – http://www.ebay.com/. When looking for a costly item, it is recommended to check first with CTCC members as they may be aware of where the best quality and price can be found or even better if a member is considering selling an extra part.
When conducting tours, drivers of Classic Thunderbirds of CTCC communicate by Motorola Spirit MU21CV, 464.500 MHz, two-way radios. While these radios are no longer manufactured, they can be found along with the charging device on eBay. You may wish to pay more for the Motorola RDU202, replacement radio. Before making a purchase it is best to check with an experienced Club member to ensure you have the proper model and frequency. You may even discover there is an extra radio for sale at a very reasonable price within CTCC.
Insurance for your Classic Thunderbird:
Companies that specialize in antique automobile insurance include, but are not limited to, the following:
· American Collectors
· Classic Collectors
· Grundy
· Hagerty
· J.C. Taylor
Care and storage of your Classic Thunderbird:
It is good practice to change your engine oil annually even if you put very few miles on your Classic Thunderbird. When doing so, look for oil that includes additives for antique automobiles and also change the oil filter. It is recommended to add a quick disconnect to the battery. It should be used when the vehicle is not in use. When you are not driving your Classic Thunderbird during cold weather months it is important that you start your Thunderbird at least once a month for twenty or more minutes. It is wise to disconnect the battery from the automobile’s electrical system and connect it to a “drip” or “trickle” charger to help ensure there is a sufficient charge the next time you start your Classic Thunderbird. A fuel additive, such as super concentrated PRI-G Complete Gasoline Treatment that can be purchased on eBay, is essential to keep your gasoline fresh. Other fuel additives, such as Sea Foam Motor Treatment for gas and diesel engines, will help performance and lessen normal wear and tear. They can be found in the automotive section of most discount or auto supply stores. It is also recommended to maintain your Classic Thunderbird’s tire pressure at 35 psi.
Closing Message:
The future of the Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland is only as promising as the potential contribution of our newest member(s). Thus, we welcome you with open arms and will make every attempt to make you feel comfortable. We trust you will actively participate in as many activities as possible so you can make your membership experience truly enjoyable and memorable.
Welcome to the Classic Thunderbird Club of Chicagoland and happy motoring,
Len Keil
President
PS: Be sure to let us know how we can best serve you!

Appendices:
· History of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbird
· Classic Thunderbird Data Plate Decoder
· The Thunderbird in Native American Culture
· The Thunderbird and Entertainment – Song, Movies & Wine

Enclosures: (Mail or email attachment)
· Recent issue of the CTCC “Bird News”
· CTCC Membership Roster

History of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbird[1]

William Boyer, design engineer for the first Thunderbird, said, “…the original Thunderbird was a spontaneous reaction to a national urge to fun motoring.” In addition “…a premier American Sporty car, Thunderbird inspired many imitators and created a niche for fun driving sporty cars on the American automotive scene.” From the very beginning, Thunderbird captured the enthusiasm of its many followers by setting trends. A removable hardtop, power seats, telescoping steering wheel and engine dress up kit were part of the mystique of the first Thunderbird.

The 1955 Thunderbird joined the Ford automobile family in the fall of 1954 as an eye-catching two seater intended as a personal car. It singlehandedly started the personal luxury car segment of the market in the United States. When first shown at the Detroit Auto Show on February 20, 1954, the car had it all --- the looks, the performance, the promise --- except for one important ingredient --- the name. It was nameless.

A Ford automobile stylist, Alden “Gib” Giberson, won a $250 suit of clothes for entering “Thunderbird” on a “name that car” contest that had 5,000 entries. Thunderbird is the name for a legendary bird known to American Indians as a good luck omen. This mythical bird was supposed to have caused thunder, lightning and rain. It symbolized among other things power, swiftness and prosperity.

The first production Thunderbird, bearing the now legendary name and emblem, rolled off the line at Ford’s Dearborn Assembly Plant, September 9, 1954. The first one was sold October of that year, almost a month before the November 12 public introduction.

The new two seaters were 52.1 inches high with 5.5 inch road clearance, 102 inch wheelbase and a curb weight of 2,833 pounds. Standard power train was a 292 cubic inch V-8 engine that produced 193 horsepower when teamed with the standard three speed manual transmission and optional overdrive. First year Thunderbird production estimated to be 10,000 if successful was 16,155 cars, over five times that of the competing Corvette.

A unique feature to the two seat Thunderbird was the separate tops ---- a removable fibre glass hardtop for foul weather and a completely hidden storable convertible soft top for a very clean top down look in fair and sunny weather. The distinctive “portholes” were added to improve rear quarter visibility, as a no cost option in 1956.

Also, the 1956 Thunderbird, rarest of all the first three year’s production of 15,631, incorporated Ford’s new “Lifeguard Design” safety concept of “packaging of passengers.” Standard equipment included a deep center steering wheel and double grip door latches. Seat belts, energy absorbing instrument panel padding and padded sun visors were optional.

The Continental spare, standard only on the 1956 Thunderbird, was intended to add greater volume to the cramped trunk compartment. With the addition of the Continental kit came a reinforced frame and longer rear springs which also improved handling over the 1955 model. To handle the additional weight in the frame and Continental configuration a 312 cubic inch V-8 engine rated at 225 horsepower when the optional Fordomatic automatic transmission was added.

Another enhancement to that year’s model was the addition of side cowl vents to provide heat dissipation under the instrument panel. Also added were both the side wind wings and sun visors which help deflect the wind turbulence during open air driving.

For 1957 the Thunderbird saw styling changes to maintain the contemporary body lines of the 1957 Ford. To enhance the cooling of higher performance engines a larger grille opening was added. A more substantial front bumper with integral parking lights and bumper guards completed the cleaner front end. Deck and quarter panels extended the crispness into the rear theme of the vehicle with a fin a little more horizontal than the big Ford. Although redesigned, the rear bumper maintained dual exhaust ports of all two seat Thunderbirds. A new frame to handle rear end weight accommodated a 14 inch tire which also reduced the diameter of the spare allowing for its return to the trunk compartment. In addition to four barrel 312 cubic V-8, optional engines also included a two four barrel model as well as a supercharged four barrel rated at 300 horsepower. Final year production for the two seat Thunderbird was 21,380 units.

The last Thunderbird rolled off the assembly on December 13, 1957. The 1955 to 1957 two seat Thunderbirds were acclaimed an American Classic just four years later by Today Show host Dave Garroway. Vic Take of Clayton, Missouri heard the Garroway comment and took the first steps toward forming Classic Thunderbird Club International. Of the total 53,166 “classic” two seat Thunderbirds that were produced; some knowledgeable enthusiasts believe more than half still exist today.
[1] Summarized from CTCC 1988 new member packet from sources believed to be correct.


The Thunderbird in Native American Culture

The Thunderbird is a mythical creature in North America indigenous peoples’ culture. Reference to the Thunderbird can be found in the lore of many tribes across North America to include the Illini.

The Thunderbird’s name comes from the common belief that the beating of its enormous wings causes thunder and stirs the wind. The Lakota name for the Thunderbird is Wakiya, from wakhq, meaning “sacred,” and kiya, meaning “winged.”[1] The Kwakwaka’wakw have many names for the Thunderbird and the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) called him Kw-Uhnx-Wa. The Ojibwa word for a thunderbird that is associated with thunder is animikii, while large thunderous birds are known as binesi.

Across the various cultures, the Thunderbird carries many of the same characteristics. It is described as a large bird, capable of creating storms and thundering while it flies. Thunder is made by its clapping wings and lightning shoots from its eyes. Dark clouds pulled together by its wings beats prevent the Thunderbird from being seen. In masks, it is depicted as many-colored, with two curling horns, and often, teeth with its beak. The Thunderbird is often depicted perched on top of a Northwest Coastal totem pole.

The Thunderbird has been depicted as a single animal or species. In both cases the Thunderbird is portrayed as being intelligent, powerful, and wrathful. Single Thunderbirds are often portrayed as carrying messages of the Great Spirit or controlling rain that was so important, especially, the peoples of the arid Southwest. Legend has it that families of Thunderbirds who kept to themselves but wore human form were said to have lived along the northern tip of Vancouver Island. The story goes that other tribes soon forgot the nature of these Thunderbird families, and when one tribe tried to take them as slaves the Thunderbird put on their feather blankets and transformed to take vengeance upon their foolish captors.

There are numerous stories about the Thunderbird with the following two perhaps the best well known.

The Passamaquoddy Legend of Thunderbird’s Origin:

The Passamodquoddy tell of two Indians who plotted to discover the origin of thunder.[2] [3] Traveling north they eventually came to a high range of magical mountains; the peaks would draw apart, move backwards and forwards, then close. The first Indian to try leaping through the cleft succeeded, but the second was crushed. The survivor found himself on a large plain where he saw a group of warriors playing ball. The warriors eventually tired of their game, entered their wigwams to put on wings, then emerged with bows and arrows and flew up, southward over the mountains, to hunt: The Passamaquoddy Indian had discovered the home of the Thunderbirds. He spoke with the old men of the village about his mission; they pounded him in a large mortar until all his bones were broken, then reshaped him with wings and sent him back south. This is the story of how the Passamaquoddy came to have a lone Thunderbird to keep watch eye over them.

The “Thunderbird and Killerwhale:”

Mythologies of the Quillayute Indians of the Pacific Northwest tell of a story of a Killerwhale that invaded their bay scaring off the salmon.[1] The Great Spirit answered their need. After a long fight Thunderbird subdued Killerwhale. Thunderbird arrived in thunder and lightning leaving them with Killerwhale to eat and for the salmon to return saving the Quillayute from starvation.

The origin of the Thunderbird is unknown. However, some researchers believe that Thunderbird legend may be based on sightings of real birds, with some even posing early sightings could have been from descendants of the pterodactyl dinosaur species.[2] Spaniards exploring the Southwest were told of stories of giant birds living in caves that often carried off unsuspecting Indians. Some believe there may be some truth to these stories as early artifacts depict birds that are very similar to prehistoric flying reptiles. The Illini have a legend of a Piasi, which means bird that devours man. Many explorers of the seventh and eighteenth century to the Midwest describe a painting of a Piasa in their journals that was on a cliff in the vicinity of what is now Alton, Illinois. Unfortunately, erosion has since caused the cliff to fall into the Mississippi River. An Illinois writer, John Russell, explored caves in 1848 where the Piasa was said to have lived and found one cave with remains that supposedly supported the Illini’s story.

The Thunderbird is depicted in Native American jewelry, pottery and artifacts of many tribes. There has been mention in automotive journals that the beautiful pastel colors of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbirds were inspired by Southwestern Indian jewelry. This might be the case, but researchers believe much of the jewelry that has been crafted since the 1930’s is a result of what was asked to be made to satisfy customer demand versus being attributable to actual earlier Indian culture.

[1] “Thunderbird (mythology), Thunderbird and Whale, www.scouttroup.org/pa/bsa/228/TheLegendoftheThunderbird2.htm, accessed 6/16/2011.
[2] Thunderbirds; Did the American Indians see ‘Winged Dinosaurs’?, www.answersingenesis.org/creation/v24/i2/thunderbirds.asp, accessed 6/16/2011.

The “Thunderbird and Killerwhale:”

Mythologies of the Quillayute Indians of the Pacific Northwest tell of a story of a Killerwhale that invaded their bay scaring off the salmon.[1] The Great Spirit answered their need. After a long fight Thunderbird subdued Killerwhale. Thunderbird arrived in thunder and lightning leaving them with Killerwhale to eat and for the salmon to return saving the Quillayute from starvation.

The origin of the Thunderbird is unknown. However, some researchers believe that Thunderbird legend may be based on sightings of real birds, with some even posing early sightings could have been from descendants of the pterodactyl dinosaur species.[2] Spaniards exploring the Southwest were told of stories of giant birds living in caves that often carried off unsuspecting Indians. Some believe there may be some truth to these stories as early artifacts depict birds that are very similar to prehistoric flying reptiles. The Illini have a legend of a Piasi, which means bird that devours man. Many explorers of the seventh and eighteenth century to the Midwest describe a painting of a Piasa in their journals that was on a cliff in the vicinity of what is now Alton, Illinois. Unfortunately, erosion has since caused the cliff to fall into the Mississippi River. An Illinois writer, John Russell, explored caves in 1848 where the Piasa was said to have lived and found one cave with remains that supposedly supported the Illini’s story.

The Thunderbird is depicted in Native American jewelry, pottery and artifacts of many tribes. There has been mention in automotive journals that the beautiful pastel colors of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbirds were inspired by Southwestern Indian jewelry. This might be the case, but researchers believe much of the jewelry that has been crafted since the 1930’s is a result of what was asked to be made to satisfy customer demand versus being attributable to actual earlier Indian culture.

[1] “Thunderbird (mythology), Thunderbird and Whale, www.scouttroup.org/pa/bsa/228/TheLegendoftheThunderbird2.htm, accessed 6/16/2011.
[2] Thunderbirds; Did the American Indians see ‘Winged Dinosaurs’?, www.answersingenesis.org/creation/v24/i2/thunderbirds.asp, accessed 6/16/2011.

The “Thunderbird and Killerwhale:”

Mythologies of the Quillayute Indians of the Pacific Northwest tell of a story of a Killerwhale that invaded their bay scaring off the salmon.[1] The Great Spirit answered their need. After a long fight Thunderbird subdued Killerwhale. Thunderbird arrived in thunder and lightning leaving them with Killerwhale to eat and for the salmon to return saving the Quillayute from starvation.

The origin of the Thunderbird is unknown. However, some researchers believe that Thunderbird legend may be based on sightings of real birds, with some even posing early sightings could have been from descendants of the pterodactyl dinosaur species.[2] Spaniards exploring the Southwest were told of stories of giant birds living in caves that often carried off unsuspecting Indians. Some believe there may be some truth to these stories as early artifacts depict birds that are very similar to prehistoric flying reptiles. The Illini have a legend of a Piasi, which means bird that devours man. Many explorers of the seventh and eighteenth century to the Midwest describe a painting of a Piasa in their journals that was on a cliff in the vicinity of what is now Alton, Illinois. Unfortunately, erosion has since caused the cliff to fall into the Mississippi River. An Illinois writer, John Russell, explored caves in 1848 where the Piasa was said to have lived and found one cave with remains that supposedly supported the Illini’s story.

The Thunderbird is depicted in Native American jewelry, pottery and artifacts of many tribes. There has been mention in automotive journals that the beautiful pastel colors of the 1955 to 1957 Ford Thunderbirds were inspired by Southwestern Indian jewelry. This might be the case, but researchers believe much of the jewelry that has been crafted since the 1930’s is a result of what was asked to be made to satisfy customer demand versus being attributable to actual earlier Indian culture.

[1] “Thunderbird (mythology), Thunderbird and Whale, www.scouttroup.org/pa/bsa/228/TheLegendoftheThunderbird2.htm, accessed 6/16/2011.
[2] Thunderbirds; Did the American Indians see ‘Winged Dinosaurs’?, www.answersingenesis.org/creation/v24/i2/thunderbirds.asp, accessed 6/16/2011.

The Thunderbird and Entertainment

Books, Memorabilia, Songs, Movies & Wine

If not already, you may soon find yourself having great interest in Classic Thunderbird related history and items. This can range from simple enjoyable activities, to extensive knowledge of the Classic Thunderbird or building an extensive collection.
Thunderbird books: The following is a list of titles that is not intended to be comprehensive in nature:
· Thunderbird! An Illustrated History of the Ford T-Bird, by Ray Miller and Glenn Embree, Note: This is considered a “Classic” and has several editions.
· Thunderbird 1955-1966; American Classics, by Alan Tast
· Thunderbird; Fifty Years, by Alan Tast
· Ford Thunderbird (Full Throttle), by Tracy Mauer
· The Book of the Ford Thunderbird, Brian Long
· The Ford Thunderbird, The History of an American Classic, by Roy Bacon
· Thunderbird Chronicle, the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide
· Fords of the Fifties, by Michael Parris
· Ford Y-Block; How to Repair and Rebuild the 1954-1962 OHV V-8, by James Eickman
· Thunderbird; 2002, by Michael Lamm
· Ford Thunderbird Ads, 1955-1969, by Harry Ilaria (CD Rom)

Thunderbird Memorabilia: There is a wide array of items that you may find of personal interest. This may include models, gift items, oil cans & pumps, signs, etc. You may even purchase and wear clothing that matches the color of your Classic Thunderbird. If you are purchasing an item just because you like it fine, but unless you are an informed, knowledgeable collector do not begin to think what you pay is likely to be a sound investment. The serious collector needs to do extensive study and affiliate with those they can trust as much as possible.

The Thunderbird in Song: Song writers and recording artists began to embed the persona of the Thunderbird in our Pop Culture soon after its debut to the driving public. Web site http://www.portholeauthority.com/ lists over 30 song titles from well known artists as The Beach Boys (Fun, Fun, Fun & Little Deuce Coupe), John Denver (Along for the Ride), George Strait (Firemen), Alan Jackson (First Love), Bob Seger (Makin’ Thunderbirds) and recently the jazz song Peel Me a Grape that has become part of the live performance repertoire of modern torch singer Dianna Krall.


The Thunderbird in Movies: The Ford Thunderbird is no stranger to Hollywood. The iconic beauty can be seen in many motion pictures too numerous to mention. Entering “ford thunderbird in movies” in a search browser should result in: automotivemileposts.com/moivestbirds.html and www.imcdb.org/vehichles_make-Ford_model-Thunderbird.html. The former site lists individual movie titles and has categories for the fifties, sixties and seventies. The latter site has over 1,000 entries of pictures from movies and television series of Thunderbirds of all vintages.


Thunderbird Wine: A discussion of “fun” items would not be complete without mentioning Thunderbird Wine. It is often said, “The history of Thunderbird Wine is certainly as interesting as the drunken effects one experiences from the wine,” but hopefully not as painful!

The label on a bottle of Thunderbird wine lists Thunderbird Ltd., but it is actually produced by the well known E&J Gallo Company of Modesto, California. After World War II, Gallo had the vision of becoming the “Campbell’s Soup” of the wine industry. Legend has it that the company got the idea for the taste of the cactus-flavored fortified wine from watching Mexican workers in Southern California mixing juice & wine. Launched in 1957, Thunderbird Wine is still produced today in 750ml bottles and a devastating 50 ounce jug.

Thunderbird Wine was intentionally target marketed to the lower class, inner city that would be unimaginable today in our more politically correct society. There are stories of distributors purposely placing Thunderbird in the alleys of Los Angeles and Ernest Gallo driving through a slum and asking a bum, “What’s the word?” The man replied, “Thunderbird!” The full Thunderbird Wine “jingle” is well known even today.[1]

The Thunderbird and Entertainment

Books, Memorabilia, Songs, Movies & Wine

If not already, you may soon find yourself having great interest in Classic Thunderbird related history and items. This can range from simple enjoyable activities, to extensive knowledge of the Classic Thunderbird or building an extensive collection.
Thunderbird books: The following is a list of titles that is not intended to be comprehensive in nature:
· Thunderbird! An Illustrated History of the Ford T-Bird, by Ray Miller and Glenn Embree, Note: This is considered a “Classic” and has several editions.
· Thunderbird 1955-1966; American Classics, by Alan Tast
· Thunderbird; Fifty Years, by Alan Tast
· Ford Thunderbird (Full Throttle), by Tracy Mauer
· The Book of the Ford Thunderbird, Brian Long
· The Ford Thunderbird, The History of an American Classic, by Roy Bacon
· Thunderbird Chronicle, the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide
· Fords of the Fifties, by Michael Parris
· Ford Y-Block; How to Repair and Rebuild the 1954-1962 OHV V-8, by James Eickman
· Thunderbird; 2002, by Michael Lamm
· Ford Thunderbird Ads, 1955-1969, by Harry Ilaria (CD Rom)

Thunderbird Memorabilia: There is a wide array of items that you may find of personal interest. This may include models, gift items, oil cans & pumps, signs, etc. You may even purchase and wear clothing that matches the color of your Classic Thunderbird. If you are purchasing an item just because you like it fine, but unless you are an informed, knowledgeable collector do not begin to think what you pay is likely to be a sound investment. The serious collector needs to do extensive study and affiliate with those they can trust as much as possible.

The Thunderbird in Song: Song writers and recording artists began to embed the persona of the Thunderbird in our Pop Culture soon after its debut to the driving public. Web site http://www.portholeauthority.com/ lists over 30 song titles from well known artists as The Beach Boys (Fun, Fun, Fun & Little Deuce Coupe), John Denver (Along for the Ride), George Strait (Firemen), Alan Jackson (First Love), Bob Seger (Makin’ Thunderbirds) and recently the jazz song Peel Me a Grape that has become part of the live performance repertoire of modern torch singer Dianna Krall.


The Thunderbird in Movies: The Ford Thunderbird is no stranger to Hollywood. The iconic beauty can be seen in many motion pictures too numerous to mention. Entering “ford thunderbird in movies” in a search browser should result in: automotivemileposts.com/moivestbirds.html and www.imcdb.org/vehichles_make-Ford_model-Thunderbird.html. The former site lists individual movie titles and has categories for the fifties, sixties and seventies. The latter site has over 1,000 entries of pictures from movies and television series of Thunderbirds of all vintages.


Thunderbird Wine: A discussion of “fun” items would not be complete without mentioning Thunderbird Wine. It is often said, “The history of Thunderbird Wine is certainly as interesting as the drunken effects one experiences from the wine,” but hopefully not as painful!

The label on a bottle of Thunderbird wine lists Thunderbird Ltd., but it is actually produced by the well known E&J Gallo Company of Modesto, California. After World War II, Gallo had the vision of becoming the “Campbell’s Soup” of the wine industry. Legend has it that the company got the idea for the taste of the cactus-flavored fortified wine from watching Mexican workers in Southern California mixing juice & wine. Launched in 1957, Thunderbird Wine is still produced today in 750ml bottles and a devastating 50 ounce jug.

Thunderbird Wine was intentionally target marketed to the lower class, inner city that would be unimaginable today in our more politically correct society. There are stories of distributors purposely placing Thunderbird in the alleys of Los Angeles and Ernest Gallo driving through a slum and asking a bum, “What’s the word?” The man replied, “Thunderbird!” The full Thunderbird Wine “jingle” is well known even today.[1]

The Thunderbird and Entertainment

Books, Memorabilia, Songs, Movies & Wine

If not already, you may soon find yourself having great interest in Classic Thunderbird related history and items. This can range from simple enjoyable activities, to extensive knowledge of the Classic Thunderbird or building an extensive collection.
Thunderbird books: The following is a list of titles that is not intended to be comprehensive in nature:
· Thunderbird! An Illustrated History of the Ford T-Bird, by Ray Miller and Glenn Embree, Note: This is considered a “Classic” and has several editions.
· Thunderbird 1955-1966; American Classics, by Alan Tast
· Thunderbird; Fifty Years, by Alan Tast
· Ford Thunderbird (Full Throttle), by Tracy Mauer
· The Book of the Ford Thunderbird, Brian Long
· The Ford Thunderbird, The History of an American Classic, by Roy Bacon
· Thunderbird Chronicle, the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide
· Fords of the Fifties, by Michael Parris
· Ford Y-Block; How to Repair and Rebuild the 1954-1962 OHV V-8, by James Eickman
· Thunderbird; 2002, by Michael Lamm
· Ford Thunderbird Ads, 1955-1969, by Harry Ilaria (CD Rom)

Thunderbird Memorabilia: There is a wide array of items that you may find of personal interest. This may include models, gift items, oil cans & pumps, signs, etc. You may even purchase and wear clothing that matches the color of your Classic Thunderbird. If you are purchasing an item just because you like it fine, but unless you are an informed, knowledgeable collector do not begin to think what you pay is likely to be a sound investment. The serious collector needs to do extensive study and affiliate with those they can trust as much as possible.

The Thunderbird in Song: Song writers and recording artists began to embed the persona of the Thunderbird in our Pop Culture soon after its debut to the driving public. Web site http://www.portholeauthority.com/ lists over 30 song titles from well known artists as The Beach Boys (Fun, Fun, Fun & Little Deuce Coupe), John Denver (Along for the Ride), George Strait (Firemen), Alan Jackson (First Love), Bob Seger (Makin’ Thunderbirds) and recently the jazz song Peel Me a Grape that has become part of the live performance repertoire of modern torch singer Dianna Krall.


The Thunderbird in Movies: The Ford Thunderbird is no stranger to Hollywood. The iconic beauty can be seen in many motion pictures too numerous to mention. Entering “ford thunderbird in movies” in a search browser should result in: automotivemileposts.com/moivestbirds.html and www.imcdb.org/vehichles_make-Ford_model-Thunderbird.html. The former site lists individual movie titles and has categories for the fifties, sixties and seventies. The latter site has over 1,000 entries of pictures from movies and television series of Thunderbirds of all vintages.


Thunderbird Wine: A discussion of “fun” items would not be complete without mentioning Thunderbird Wine. It is often said, “The history of Thunderbird Wine is certainly as interesting as the drunken effects one experiences from the wine,” but hopefully not as painful!

The label on a bottle of Thunderbird wine lists Thunderbird Ltd., but it is actually produced by the well known E&J Gallo Company of Modesto, California. After World War II, Gallo had the vision of becoming the “Campbell’s Soup” of the wine industry. Legend has it that the company got the idea for the taste of the cactus-flavored fortified wine from watching Mexican workers in Southern California mixing juice & wine. Launched in 1957, Thunderbird Wine is still produced today in 750ml bottles and a devastating 50 ounce jug.

Thunderbird Wine was intentionally target marketed to the lower class, inner city that would be unimaginable today in our more politically correct society. There are stories of distributors purposely placing Thunderbird in the alleys of Los Angeles and Ernest Gallo driving through a slum and asking a bum, “What’s the word?” The man replied, “Thunderbird!” The full Thunderbird Wine “jingle” is well known even today.[1]


What’s the word?
Thunderbird
How’s it sold?
Good and cold
The Thunderbird and Entertainment

Books, Memorabilia, Songs, Movies & Wine

If not already, you may soon find yourself having great interest in Classic Thunderbird related history and items. This can range from simple enjoyable activities, to extensive knowledge of the Classic Thunderbird or building an extensive collection.
Thunderbird books: The following is a list of titles that is not intended to be comprehensive in nature:
· Thunderbird! An Illustrated History of the Ford T-Bird, by Ray Miller and Glenn Embree, Note: This is considered a “Classic” and has several editions.
· Thunderbird 1955-1966; American Classics, by Alan Tast
· Thunderbird; Fifty Years, by Alan Tast
· Ford Thunderbird (Full Throttle), by Tracy Mauer
· The Book of the Ford Thunderbird, Brian Long
· The Ford Thunderbird, The History of an American Classic, by Roy Bacon
· Thunderbird Chronicle, the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide
· Fords of the Fifties, by Michael Parris
· Ford Y-Block; How to Repair and Rebuild the 1954-1962 OHV V-8, by James Eickman
· Thunderbird; 2002, by Michael Lamm
· Ford Thunderbird Ads, 1955-1969, by Harry Ilaria (CD Rom)

Thunderbird Memorabilia: There is a wide array of items that you may find of personal interest. This may include models, gift items, oil cans & pumps, signs, etc. You may even purchase and wear clothing that matches the color of your Classic Thunderbird. If you are purchasing an item just because you like it fine, but unless you are an informed, knowledgeable collector do not begin to think what you pay is likely to be a sound investment. The serious collector needs to do extensive study and affiliate with those they can trust as much as possible.

The Thunderbird in Song: Song writers and recording artists began to embed the persona of the Thunderbird in our Pop Culture soon after its debut to the driving public. Web site http://www.portholeauthority.com/ lists over 30 song titles from well known artists as The Beach Boys (Fun, Fun, Fun & Little Deuce Coupe), John Denver (Along for the Ride), George Strait (Firemen), Alan Jackson (First Love), Bob Seger (Makin’ Thunderbirds) and recently the jazz song Peel Me a Grape that has become part of the live performance repertoire of modern torch singer Dianna Krall.


The Thunderbird in Movies: The Ford Thunderbird is no stranger to Hollywood. The iconic beauty can be seen in many motion pictures too numerous to mention. Entering “ford thunderbird in movies” in a search browser should result in: automotivemileposts.com/moivestbirds.html and www.imcdb.org/vehichles_make-Ford_model-Thunderbird.html. The former site lists individual movie titles and has categories for the fifties, sixties and seventies. The latter site has over 1,000 entries of pictures from movies and television series of Thunderbirds of all vintages.


Thunderbird Wine: A discussion of “fun” items would not be complete without mentioning Thunderbird Wine. It is often said, “The history of Thunderbird Wine is certainly as interesting as the drunken effects one experiences from the wine,” but hopefully not as painful!

The label on a bottle of Thunderbird wine lists Thunderbird Ltd., but it is actually produced by the well known E&J Gallo Company of Modesto, California. After World War II, Gallo had the vision of becoming the “Campbell’s Soup” of the wine industry. Legend has it that the company got the idea for the taste of the cactus-flavored fortified wine from watching Mexican workers in Southern California mixing juice & wine. Launched in 1957, Thunderbird Wine is still produced today in 750ml bottles and a devastating 50 ounce jug.

Thunderbird Wine was intentionally target marketed to the lower class, inner city that would be unimaginable today in our more politically correct society. There are stories of distributors purposely placing Thunderbird in the alleys of Los Angeles and Ernest Gallo driving through a slum and asking a bum, “What’s the word?” The man replied, “Thunderbird!” The full Thunderbird Wine “jingle” is well known even today.[1]


What’s the word?
Thunderbird
How’s it sold?
Good and coldThe Thunderbird and Entertainment

Books, Memorabilia, Songs, Movies & Wine

If not already, you may soon find yourself having great interest in Classic Thunderbird related history and items. This can range from simple enjoyable activities, to extensive knowledge of the Classic Thunderbird or building an extensive collection.
Thunderbird books: The following is a list of titles that is not intended to be comprehensive in nature:
· Thunderbird! An Illustrated History of the Ford T-Bird, by Ray Miller and Glenn Embree, Note: This is considered a “Classic” and has several editions.
· Thunderbird 1955-1966; American Classics, by Alan Tast
· Thunderbird; Fifty Years, by Alan Tast
· Ford Thunderbird (Full Throttle), by Tracy Mauer
· The Book of the Ford Thunderbird, Brian Long
· The Ford Thunderbird, The History of an American Classic, by Roy Bacon
· Thunderbird Chronicle, the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide
· Fords of the Fifties, by Michael Parris
· Ford Y-Block; How to Repair and Rebuild the 1954-1962 OHV V-8, by James Eickman
· Thunderbird; 2002, by Michael Lamm
· Ford Thunderbird Ads, 1955-1969, by Harry Ilaria (CD Rom)

Thunderbird Memorabilia: There is a wide array of items that you may find of personal interest. This may include models, gift items, oil cans & pumps, signs, etc. You may even purchase and wear clothing that matches the color of your Classic Thunderbird. If you are purchasing an item just because you like it fine, but unless you are an informed, knowledgeable collector do not begin to think what you pay is likely to be a sound investment. The serious collector needs to do extensive study and affiliate with those they can trust as much as possible.

The Thunderbird in Song: Song writers and recording artists began to embed the persona of the Thunderbird in our Pop Culture soon after its debut to the driving public. Web site http://www.portholeauthority.com/ lists over 30 song titles from well known artists as The Beach Boys (Fun, Fun, Fun & Little Deuce Coupe), John Denver (Along for the Ride), George Strait (Firemen), Alan Jackson (First Love), Bob Seger (Makin’ Thunderbirds) and recently the jazz song Peel Me a Grape that has become part of the live performance repertoire of modern torch singer Dianna Krall.


The Thunderbird in Movies: The Ford Thunderbird is no stranger to Hollywood. The iconic beauty can be seen in many motion pictures too numerous to mention. Entering “ford thunderbird in movies” in a search browser should result in: automotivemileposts.com/moivestbirds.html and www.imcdb.org/vehichles_make-Ford_model-Thunderbird.html. The former site lists individual movie titles and has categories for the fifties, sixties and seventies. The latter site has over 1,000 entries of pictures from movies and television series of Thunderbirds of all vintages.


Thunderbird Wine: A discussion of “fun” items would not be complete without mentioning Thunderbird Wine. It is often said, “The history of Thunderbird Wine is certainly as interesting as the drunken effects one experiences from the wine,” but hopefully not as painful!

The label on a bottle of Thunderbird wine lists Thunderbird Ltd., but it is actually produced by the well known E&J Gallo Company of Modesto, California. After World War II, Gallo had the vision of becoming the “Campbell’s Soup” of the wine industry. Legend has it that the company got the idea for the taste of the cactus-flavored fortified wine from watching Mexican workers in Southern California mixing juice & wine. Launched in 1957, Thunderbird Wine is still produced today in 750ml bottles and a devastating 50 ounce jug.

Thunderbird Wine was intentionally target marketed to the lower class, inner city that would be unimaginable today in our more politically correct society. There are stories of distributors purposely placing Thunderbird in the alleys of Los Angeles and Ernest Gallo driving through a slum and asking a bum, “What’s the word?” The man replied, “Thunderbird!” The full Thunderbird Wine “jingle” is well known even today.[1]


What’s the word?
Thunderbird
How’s it sold?
Good and cold
What’s the jive?
Bird’s alive
What’s the price?
Thirty twice


[1]At a late 1950’s price of $0.60 (thirty twice) Thunderbird Wine also soon became known as an American Classic, but as a “bum wine.” Of the bum wines, such as MD20/20, Night Train and Wild Irish Rose, it is certainly the most storied and classy. Like the automobile, the wine has also become the subject of songs by various artists.
[1] Thunderbird, www.bumwine.com/tbird.html, accessed 6/16/2011.

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